August 12, 2022

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This is how a fraudulent stock ‘buying and selling’ company works Goes down the street | Scams | Investment | Stock Market | SBS | Pass-in-the-street

They were given 7% monthly profit. They just need to open an account with $250 and then things will be easy. Buy and sell oil, netflix, bitcoins and shares in the world’s most recognized companies. They are accompanied by responsible and empathetic counselors at all times. Many accepted without thinking In a few days.

Same is the case Light garaycar, who invested $8,000 dollars in Capitalix; His first intention was not to invest with them, but to invest in Banco de Credito del Peru (BCP). She filled all her information in a form with the name of that bank, but it was all a false advertisement. Luz had sent his data and interest in investing Capitalics.

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Capitalix is ​​an international company with an address in the islands Seychelles, a tax haven. Additionally, according to its website, it is regulated FSA. However, this authority has not existed since 2013. It is an agency in the UK called the Financial Services Commission.

After Luz sent her information, Capitalix contacted her and convinced her to invest her money. They told her to put it on her credit card, and she did. Luz charged $8,000 dollars from her credit card Interbank.

They trusted an international broker who promised 7% profit per month. These companies operate with complete impunity as there is no regulation in the country. Find out more about this new form of fraud in the ninth episode of #PasaEnLaCalle

I told him my goal of pursuing a master’s degree, and he told me [la trabajadora de Capitalix]: ‘A boy in Germany wants to do a master’s degree there and invested in us, and in Latin America they don’t pay well’, you better say. Through that talk he persuaded me and I did the transaction”, Luz told El Comercio.

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The problems begin

After depositing the money, Luce’s callers’ voices began to change, which alerted her and Luce began to learn more about the company. In Network light He found more evidence of what he feared most: it was a scam. The testimonies came from different countries: Mexico, Chile and Costa Rica.

The problems started when Luss asked Capitalix to get his money back, but was told this was not possible. Always with a call from abroad, she was told that she needed to do some currency exchange, she didn’t understand anything, and she had to wait and do other activities. Once this happens, all else is lost.

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As a result, Luss lost the money he had invested, and he had to pay off his $8,000 credit card debt with Interbank.

A wave of complaints

When the episode airs #PasaEnLaCalle Regarding the investment scam with Capitalix, various people to share their testimonies. One of them is a 30-year-old who has lost 2,000 soles, who wished to remain anonymous. It also came to Capitalix with false advertising using the name BCP.

In the beginning, the first calls were very friendly, reliable, and earned you some money (supposedly). In the following days, they start asking you more money and forcing you to use your credit cards to invest in more shares and earn more. I told them I don’t use the cards and the treatment started changing and they didn’t help me at all. In the end, the money I invested was lost”, he commented.

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A fraudulent company

Capitalix is ​​based in the tax haven island of Seychelles, and they have no address in Peru. Given this, Elizabeth Mendoza, The legal coordinator at Hiper Derecho explained: “It is almost impossible to track down these remote companies or brokers. When we talk about the reliability of brokers, it is very important to take into account their location or residence, because this is where we see regulation.”.

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On the other hand, the same Capitalix website states that they are regulated by the FSA, although this authority no longer exists. Daniel ReteguiThe Banking and Insurance Supervision (SBS) supervisory co-ordinator of informal activities warns that these names are being used to provide false security to the public.

This company used those acronyms to present itself as a company controlled by this organization, which it clearly isn’t, and it’s a scheme they put together to deceive the public.Reategui said.

For this reason, experts pointed out that those who are interested in investing should go to the regulatory authority’s page and confirm that the company is actually under this company.

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Secondly, Daniel Retegui It pointed out that earning 7% monthly interest in a stable and safe manner is impossible for companies in formal financial system. “These companies do not have the ability to pay 7% per month. It looks like a pyramid. When you’re paying such a high monthly fee, it’s understandable that the plan isn’t backed by economic activity”, said the expert.

In addition, by having all of their addresses outside of Peru and inviting customers to contact them doing so from abroad, the jurisdiction of Peruvian authorities such as the SBS and National Police It is almost zero. These companies operate with total impunity in Peru because they exist in a digital environment.

Adjust and go

You can email SBS asking if the broker is safe and legal. They will recommend.

Find the company

Check where the company is located. If you are a tax haven, it can be unreliable as there are almost no regulations and protections.

on the web

Read broker blogs and comments on social networks and see if there are positive or negative testimonials of the company.

Look for it

If the company has an address and contact point in Peru, it is safer for the customer as any doubt or claim is eased.

Further…

At work for themselves

If you are interested in this subject, this Wednesday, July 27 at 5 pm, El Comercio will host a Twitter space where we will talk about fraud when investing in stocks digitally. You can do that to enter Twitter of El Comercio.